Is Self-Improvement Different For Women Than Men?

Is Self-Improvement Different For Women Than Men?   1 comment

This article is the starting point for self-Improvement. Is Self-Improvement different because of your sex?  Self-improve has become mainstream conversation in recent years, it seems to be showing up in articles almost everywhere. Almost everyone should work on their self-confidence, happiness, career, finances, relationships, home and health. Wherever you may be, whatever your situation, you should work on self-improvement.Get ready to change your life! Set up a program and start working on it.  You can reach your full potential and create the success you deserve. There is no quick fix; the road to change is not an easy one. For this to work you must commit to and dedicated yourself to bring new changes of improvement into your life.  I suggest you take it one step at a time, the greater the commitment the longer the journey.Ask yourself is self-improvement any different for women than for men?  My answer is yes and no.  However both male and females differ physically and the fact is that a woman does have circumstances that are different from those of the man, when it comes to self-improvements they are basically the same.

Have you ever though that some men and women are born leaders?  The answer to that is no, being positive and staying positive is a choice for both men and women. One must stay positive if we are to improve ourselves. Building self-esteem and drawing lines for self-improvement is a choice, not a rule. Leaders and positive thinkers are not born they are made out of the desire for self-improve. If you want to be a leader you have to develop a burning desire for self-improvement and stay with it.

Your changes must come from inside. Your work won’t improve unless you improve regardless what your sex may be. Your relationships won’t improve unless you improve. Society won’t change unless the people in it change, meaning you. You are the only person you can change. While self-improvement is not contagious, a change in you can influence a change in others.

Now it is time for you to start putting the puzzle together for self-improvement?  First be positive. Second be contented and most of all stay happy. Don’t forget to be appreciative.  Never overlook the opportunity to compliment someone.

A positive way of life will help you build a higher self-esteem, let this be your starting point for self-improvement. Turn loose your resistance, don’t procrastinate.  Find your internal motivation then move forward toward with your self-improvement. Discover your inner self and explore your own personal powers.

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This article is the starting point for self-Improvement. Is Self-Improvement different because of your sex?  Self-improve has become mainstream conversation in recent years, it seems to be showing up in articles almost everywhere. Almost everyone should work on their self-confidence, happiness, career, finances, relationships, home and health. Wherever you may be, whatever your situation, you should work on self-improvement.

Get ready to change your life! Set up a program and start working on it.  You can reach your full potential and create the success you deserve. There is no quick fix; the road to change is not an easy one. For this to work you must commit to and dedicated yourself to bring new changes of improvement into your life.  I suggest you take it one step at a time, the greater the commitment the longer the journey.

Ask yourself is self-improvement any different for women than for men?  My…

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Anger Management and Dementia.

The truth about anger management and dementia. Simple steps to a calmer less stressful life This article talks about helping people with dementia conquer anger and improve self esteem. Whether you have problems controlling anger or know someone close to you that does then this article is sure to be of interest to you.

Older people sometimes develop dementia, a somewhat common condition that results in mental and emotional confusion. Some of these people, often those who are institutionalized, display anger outbursts due to relatively mild provocations, such as an unwanted meal item. At other times the anger is warranted, as when another resident initiates a conflict. For reasons like these and others, anger management therapy for dementia patients is becoming increasingly important.

Symptoms That May Warrant Anger Management Therapy

It may be difficult to determine at first who is eligible for anger management therapy. Residents with dementia who live at home or in nursing facilities often try to express themselves in non-traditional ways. While someone who wants their breakfast oatmeal served hotter can just say so, someone with dementia might be able to just make anxious sounds, pace, or even throw the oatmeal on the floor. If someone in your care exhibits dissatisfaction with some aspect of daily care, try to figure out what is bothering the person, and make any needed adjustments that you can.

Dementia patients may raise their voice, swing their arms, push, shove, or yank at things or people to convey their irritation. Caregivers must learn to decipher true anger from confusion or self-defense against other aggressive residents. Anger management therapy should be considered for those who express real anger inappropriately.

Some dementia residents may withdraw socially, stop talking to others, or gesticulate excitedly when they are upset. Sometimes these actions are in response to legitimate concerns, while at other times they may reflect unsuitable anger that needs to be redirected. If the person is able to understand and respond to caregivers in appropriate ways, he or she may be eligible for anger management therapy.

Anger Management Therapy for Dementia Patients

Any anger management therapy facilitator or coordinator who works with dementia residents will need to understand the way that those with dementia communicate, and the types of triggers that can draw their anger. This may require some training in long-term facility care, gerontology, and dementia behaviours. The therapist may attempt group or individual therapy, depending on the patient’s needs and abilities.

In anger management therapy, the coordinator may try to make the resident understand the consequences of anger outbursts, or attempt to teach the resident how to redirect anger in acceptable ways. At times, the therapist might want to work with the resident’s physician, social worker, and family to achieve the best results. This type of effort could take a long time and may be only partially successful yet, any progress is undoubtedly helpful.

Family members and caregivers who want to know more can visit websites like anger-management-information.com for more complete information on how to address this key social and interpersonal behavior. They also can get in touch with the doctor, nursing staff, and social worker for help in assisting a dementia patient through anger management therapy that may lead to improved outcomes for the resident and those that provide his or her care and support.